How To Approach Streamers So They Play Your Game Right Away

In this article, you’re going to get a template and a script that will show you what to say to a streamer so that it motivates them to play your game in front of their audience — right away.  

You’ll also learn how to avoid streamers putting you off and delay playing your game.  You need to learn how to get them to play your game as soon as possible. Why?  Because what happens is, as more time passes, the less chance that streamer will play your game.

So, in this article, you’re going to get tools and templates that you can use to help you improve your chances of grabbing the attention of a streamer so they play your game.

First I’ll talk about what streamers want and don’t want.  This insight is very important because once you know what they want and don’t want, you can avoid getting rejected by them, and improve your chances of them playing your game.

And then after learning these insights, you’ll get what I call a “Conversation Starter”.  It’s a template and a script you can use when you approach streamers.  

Oh, when I say “streamers”, I mean both YouTubers and Twitcher streamers.

I’ll also give you a tracking tool.  This tool is a spreadsheet so it’ll make it easier and faster for you to see what is working and what isn’t working when you approach streamers.  It’s important to track your efforts because you don’t want to use this data to help you improve your approach and avoid getting rejected  And the last thing I know you don’t want to be doing is spending all your time marketing when you can be working on your game.

So, I did all the heavy lifting for you and created these tools, scripts, and spreadsheets.  Free to use.

And remember, my goal is always to help you sell more copies of your indie game.  And I’ll give you tools, strategies, and templates to do this.   I’ll show you exactly what to say to a streamer who doesn’t know you and hasn’t heard about you yet so that they get excited and want to play your game.  And like I said, I’ve done a lot of the “heavy lifting”.  But you gotta put in the effort too.   You gotta implement these tools because the best way to get results is to take action.    

And it’s important to take action because it’s not enough just to make a quality game.  There are hundreds and thousands of good quality games that go unnoticed.  You also need to learn how to sell your game idea to players and to streamers so you cut through the noise and get heard in an overcrowded market.

And the best way to learn how to sell your game idea to players and streamers is to take the tools I’m about to share with you, implement them, and learn what you’re doing.  You can hire somebody to do all this, but that costs money.  Or you can teach yourself, with a bit of help from me, so that you now have a skill most game devs don’t: how to sell your game idea to people.

Sound good? Ok, let’s learn how to approach streamers so they play your game right away in front of their audience so you can build your own audience…

What Does A Streamer Want (Discovering This Is The Key To Their Attention)

Just like you, streamers want attention.  Like you, they want to build an audience. Like you, they want more fans.  Like you then want new fans. Like you, they want to make money and create a sustainable business that supports them now and in the long term.

And like you, it’s getting harder and harder for streamers to get heard, and get attention.  The market is oversaturated.  It seems like everybody wants to be a YouTuber and a Twitch Streamer.  It’s really easy to become a streamer — but it’s hard for streamers to get started, get noticed, and build a big audience.

This probably sounds familiar, hey? It’s a lot easier to become a game dev now.  Game engines have made the barrier to entry low.  But this also means that there is more competition.  It seems like everybody wants to be a game dev now.  And because of this, it’s getting harder to get noticed.

My point is, knowing what streamers want and don’t want is an important insight because remember, you’re not the only game dev that is approaching them.  They get bombarded with requests from game devs everyday.  Their inbox is full of free game keys that they’ll never use.  Game keys aren’t what they want.  

So if you want them to play your game in front of their audience, you need to offer them something that is in their self-interest — not yours.

In other words, you need to show them some sort of advantage to why they should play your game.

You see, when a game dev is self-interested, and approaches a streamer talking about what they want and ignores the needs and wants of the streamer, they’re going to get ignored.  

Again, streamers are constantly approached by game devs wanting the same thing: play my game! play my game! Here’s a free game key!  Play my game!

But streamers don’t care about your game.  They don’t care about how long it took you to develop your game.  They don’t care about how unique your art is or your gameplay is.  They don’t care about your life story and how you’ve become a dev.  And they don’t care if you provide them with a free game key.  

So what do streamers want?  They want three things:

1) More Views. At the end of the day, a streamer wants more views.  Why? Because more views equals more money.  And more money means they can do what they love to do: make videos.  It’s just like you, you want to sell games so that you can continue to do what you love: make more games.

2) Be The “First” In Things.  Being the first to talk about a game… being the first to get a review out… being the first to talk about breaking news… being the first to discover a new game that is going to blow up and be popular…  that’s what streamers want.  That’s because being first means views. In other words: new means views. Being new and being first means that they also find new viewers. So it’s very important to a streamer that they are up-to-date and not be the last ones to talk about something big going on in the gaming world.  

3) Be Recognized As An Authority.  From the outside, it looks like most streamers are lumped into one big category: video game content creators.   But if you look closely, each streamer has found a niche and carved out their own category.  Some streamers focus on gaming news. Some focus on reviews. Some focus on retro games. Some focus on a single game. Some on a single genre.  Yes, some will change their focus as their channel gets bigger.  

For example, I followed Mortismal Gaming for years because he talked about CRPGs (one of my favorite genres).  Now that his channel is getting bigger, he’s branching out and talking about other genres.  

Anyway, my point is, that streamers want to be seen as the “go-to” person for a certain category or topic.  Why? Because if they can become an authority on that topic, that means they rise higher in social status in their peer group.  And they want social status because it helps them stand out in the crows, and that gives them even more attention.

And this isn’t just streamers who want this — we all in a way want this.  

But my point is, if you can help them with this goal of becoming an authority, and help them rise in social status, then you’re bringing something more to the table.  You’re not asking something for nothing.  You’re not just another game dev bugging with the same approach: “Here’s a free game key, play my game!”.  You’re giving them a huge advantage if they work with you.

So What Does This Have To Do With You And Attracting Streamers?

So how does knowing these three things…

  1. Streamer wants more views
  2. Streamer wants to be first because: new means views
  3. Streamer wants to be recognized as an authority

…how do these three insights help you get a streamer to play your game?

Well, if you want a streamer to play your game, you need to show them how playing your game will get them what they want.

If you approach a streamer talking about what you want, they’re not going to listen.

You’ll improve your chances if you can show and tell a streamer what benefits or advantages they’ll get from playing your game in front of their audience.

So, let’s keep going. Let’s learn how to craft a message in a way that grabs a streamer’s attention, and gets them motivated to play your game — right away.

How To Approach A Streamer So They Play Your Game Right Now: Three Step Technique

Ok, let’s get into exactly what to say and do when approaching a streamer in a way so that they play your game as soon as possible.  

The worst is to get a streamer’s attention and they respond but they don’t play your game.  So you wait for a few weeks, and you don’t want to keep bugging them, and you ask again…but then nothing happens.  

So to avoid streamers putting your game off, and get them to play your game right away, here are three things you need to do.  Follow these exactly and it’ll help you improve your success with streamers.  

Ok, here they are…

Technique #1: Discover What Benefit You Can Bring To The Table

Remember how it’s not about YOUR self-interests… it’s about the streamers’ self-interest?  And remember how I said streamers want (1) more views, (2) to be “first” in things, and (3) want to be recognized as an authority?

Well, let’s discover what advantage you can give to a streamer and “bridge” what you have and what they want.  Once you figure this out, then when you write to them, you’ll have a better chance at success.

First, if you already have a following or even a small fanbase, then you have what streamers want: views.  Your passionate community are new potential viewers for the streamer.  So you already have a huge advantage when approaching streamers when you have your own big community.  

But I know what you’re thinking right now:

“I don’t have a large fanbase… that’s why I need streamers so that I can build a large fanbase!!!”

It’s a catch-22.  You can’t build an audience without streamers, but you can’t get streamers without an audience.

So if you don’t have a community that you can bring to the streamer, then your next advantage is your “new-ness”.

Remember, being “first” in things is important to a streamer. To streamers: New Means Views.  

And chances are, you’re developing a game that is new, unique, and innovative.  Right? That’s a good advantage so far.

But you can’t just come out and say, “hey wanna play a new, innovative game?”.  Almost every new indie game is new and innovative in some way.  

You need to figure out what makes your game unique and “bridge” that with what the streamer wants.  You need to show them the advantages they’ll get from playing your game.  And don’t worry, we’ll get into specifics on how to “bridge” what you have with what streamers want.  

But first let’s move onto…

Technique #2: Look For Streamers Looking For You

Biggest problem with game devs is their marketing is unfocused.

They’ll post on social media, make videos on YouTube, write in their blog, and they’ll blast out hundreds of emails to streamers.  And they hope that the sheer amount of content and effort they put into marketing their game will get traction and build critical mass.  

But really what they’re doing is throwing whatever they think of, up on a wall and hoping it sticks.  Then when their efforts get no traction, they lose all motivation to market their game.

But if you want somebody to do something, it’s not about numbers.  It’s not about sending 100 emails to streamers and hoping to get 10 replies.  

To get somebody to do something for you, it’s about building relationships.

Let me explain what I mean when I say “it’s all about building relationships and not about the numbers”…

It’s Counter-Intuitive, But Send Out LESS Emails Not More…

What most game devs do is do a keyword search on YouTube or Twitch.  Then they make a spreadsheet of all those streamers.  Then they’ll put in the work to find their email or twitter.  And then they’ll blast out emails or DM them on Twitter.

And that’s the intuitive thing to do.  It’s intuitive to go find like-minded streamers, make a big spreadsheet, and contact them one by one.

But let me show you a better strategy.

The counter-intuitive approach is to eliminate 80% of the list you’ve made and focus on maybe 20 streamers that align with you and your game.  

Then when you find your your top 20 streamers that align with you most,  what you do is spend a week researching each one before you contact them.  And in a moment, I’ll give you a specific action plan on how to research your top 20 streamers so it helps you craft a compelling message.

But for now, I just want to tell you here that your goal here isn’t about numbers — it’s about relationships.  

And the more you get to know your top 20 streamers, and you know what they want and don’t want, the better chances you’ll craft a message to them that will grab their attention.

But if you do the “shot-gun” approach where you make a spreadsheet, and just start emailing whoever, then you’re doing what the majority of game devs are doing.  

And this is the major cause of rejection!

Remember, it’s about their self-interest, and not about yours.  So when a game dev blasts out 100 emails to a bunch of strangers without doing any research, their approach seems needy. They never begin to think about the interests of streamers and what they want.  So they get rejected because if you want something from somebody, you also have to consider what they want.

So don’t focus on the number of emails you send.  Focus on the quality of the email.  Focus on building a relationship with them before you approach them with what you want.

Besides, think about it this way:

If you expect a streamer to play your game for an hour and then put time and energy into making a video about your game, then you also have to put in the time too.  

And by doing this research, you’re going to get insights about them that will help you when you contact them.  Again, once you know what makes your chosen streamers tick (what they like, don’t like), then you’ll craft a message to them that will strike a chord and get their attention.

Also, another big advantage is, by doing research YOU are qualifying them.  What I mean is, you want to make sure that their audience is a good fit for your game.  Because the fact is, a streamer’s audience are potential buyers.  And in marketing it’s really important to know who your target audience is.  So by doing this research, you’re also qualifying them and making sure that their audience is your target audience, too.

And this doesn’t have to be hard.  All it takes is 30 minutes a day.

Each week, find ONE like-minded, indie-friendly streamer. Look for a streamer that loves the games you love.  Better yet, find a streamer that loves games that are similar to the game you’re making.  Say, for example, your biggest inspiration is Portal.  And you’re making a game that was inspired by Portal.  Then look for streamers who also love Portal.  You’ll have a better chance of grabbing their attention because now you have a commonality.

Ok, so once you’ve found your streamer, then in the next 5 days, watch their content 25 minutes a day.  Then spend 5 minutes commenting.

I would suggest that for YouTubers, start with their most Popular videos.  See what their audience resonates with the most.  Then watch their newest videos.  Spend 25 minutes a day watching.  And 5 minutes a day commenting.

For Twitch streamers, check out their highlighted videos that they saved.  Again, this will show you what their audience resonates with.  And make it a commitment to catch a live stream, and comment.  Again, spend 25 minutes, and 5 minutes to comment.

But quick warning: this isn’t your opportunity to spam your game.  Just be genuinely interested in what they’re doing, and let them know by commenting on what you like.  Sometimes, the best marketing is no marketing.

And remember, you’re doing this research also to find out if their target audience is your target audience.  This is important because when you eventually write your message to that streamer, it’ll be a lot easier to talk to them and build a relationship with them because you both have a commonality.

So, make a commitment in the next 5 days, and spend 30 minutes researching a streamer that aligns with your game and genre.  And make sure you comment on their content.  Start building that relationship so that when you approach them, they sort of know you already, you and them have something in common.

Once you understand who they are, what they like and don’t like, then you can begin crafting a compelling message.  But first, let’s go onto…

Technique #3: Write An Attention-Grabbing Message

In a moment I’m going to give you templates and scripts and more detailed how-to guides on how to approach a streamer.  But I need to show you one more technique…

Most game devs do things backward when they approach streamers.  They first write the message.  Then they go out and make a big spreadsheet of all the streamers they want to contact.  Then they tailor their message so that it doesn’t look and sound like a generic message that is pumped out by a PR person.  Then they wait.

But what I suggest is that before you write a single word, you do your research first.  That’s why I spent a lot of time telling you about Technique #2: Look For Streamers Looking For You.

The reason I want you to spend more time researching than pumping out emails is that it’s important that you UNDERSTAND what streamers want and don’t want.  That’s because when you understand what streamers want and don’t want, it’ll be a lot easier to write your message and have them read it and respond to it.

Ok, so let’s move on… let’s say you did your research and found your top 20 streamers that align with you and your game (see Techniques 1 and 2 above).  Once you get that done, now you’re ready to craft your message.  So let me show you how to do that…

Remember, people are self-interested and selfish.  I’m not saying this is good or bad.  What I’m saying is, you’ll have a better chance of grabbing a streamer’s attention once you know what they want.  

However, if you approach a streamer talking about what YOU want, then it’ll be ignored.

Streamers don’t care about the quality of a game… or what tech was used to make it… or how small a studio is… or how much effort was put into a game… or how long it took to make the game… or that a dev quit their job and took a risk and is now a full-time game dev… or how unique the gameplay and art is.

Streamers don’t care about any of that.

What they care about is if playing your game will get them more views, or more attention in some way, or help them improve their social status among their peers.

So when crafting your message, avoid talking about your self-interest, and put the focus on what the streamer is going to get.

This is what I mean when I said “bridge” what you have with what they want.  So, let me show you exactly how to build that “bridge”…

The Best Thing You Can Bring To The Table: Something NEW

Remember how I said “new means views”? Well, what is new about your game? To help you answer that, what problem are you trying to solve? What are some challenges your genre has that you’re trying to address and fix?

That is a lot more interesting to a streamer than how many years a dev has put into a game… or how unique the game art is… or how big or small the dev’s studio is.  It’s more interesting to a streamer because they know that’s what’s interesting to their audience.  Their audience are hungry for the new and novel. Their audience wants to see the “next best thing”.  And the streamer wants to be the first one to say, “I knew this dev before they got huge”.

But remember, you’re not the only one that is making a unique and novel game.  Hundreds and thousands of other game devs are doing the same thing.

But not every game dev is trying to fix a problem in their genre.  Most game devs are more worried about their image and their self-interest to even care what the players want.  So game devs resort to talking about how new and impressive their game is — and never care what the player wants.

But by explaining how your game is trying to fix issues in your genre, you’re no longer talking about your self-interests.  You are now speaking directly to the self-interests of the player.   Players who have problems with their favorite games and favorite genres will stop and listen when someone actually hears their complaints, talks about them, and is trying to fix them.

And this is what streamers want: they want the attention of their audience.  And they want new viewers.

So if you can help them get the attention of their audience and help them get new viewers, then you’re bringing something new to the table.  You’re no longer another game dev that is bugging a streamer to “play my game!!!”.  You’re giving them content that players will pay attention to.

Remember, people are selfish and self-interested. If you approach them with your wants and needs, then it’ll be difficult to get them to do what you want.

But if you come to them and show and tell them how playing your game will benefit them, then they’ll listen.

This is why I’m suggesting you talk about how your game is trying to fix big problems in your genre.  You’re no longer talking about your selfish needs… you are addressing their selfish needs.  They have a problem.  They want to be heard.  They want somebody to come in and fix that problem.  This is what grabs a player’s attention.  And player attention is what streamers want.

Again, what you’re bringing to the table when you do this is “player attention”.  

Ok, let’s move on to more concrete and tangible how-tos.  Let me give you an email script and a tracking tool, next…

Three Simple Action Steps: How To Get A Streamer To Play Your Game Right Now

To help you create a compelling message that motivates a streamer to play your game in front of their audience so that you grow your wishlist and sell more game copies when you launch, then here are 3 action steps you need to take…

Step 1:  Figure Out What Problem Is Your Game Solving In Your Genre

Remember, before approaching a streamer, you need to bring something to the table.  You need to show the streamer an advantage as to why they should play your game.  You need to “bridge” the gap between what you have and what they want.

And ultimately, what a streamer wants is “audience attention”.

So how do you do this exactly?

To help you figure this out, I want you to answer me this question:

What Problem Is Your Game Solving In Your Genre?

Think of a challenge or frustration or issue your genre has.  And tell me about how your game aims to solve that problem.

This is important to figure out because this is far more compelling than talking about how many hours you put in your game… or your story of why you became a dev… or how cool and unique your game is.

This is compelling because it’s what players want to hear about.  Players have problems, challenges, issues with games and genres.  And they never get tired of hearing about these problems, challenges, and frustrations.

Think about it this way.  Say your car has a small tire leak.  And it’s sitting there in the driveway, slowly losing air.   And no matter how busy you get in your day, or how distracted you are, in the back of your mind, this small tire leak is bugging you.  And let’s say for example you want to take a break and surf YouTube for 10 minutes.  Then you notice a video: “How to fix a slow leak fast and easy”.  If you see that, you’re going to click that right away.  

It’s the same with gamers.  They have “tire leak” problems all the time.  They have nagging issues with games and genres that are always in the back of their mind.  And when a video comes up about that problem and how there is a fix for that problem, they will perk up and click.

So, focus on player problems, challenges, issues.  Because that’s what they’re self-interested in.  That’s what gets views for streamers.

Also remember, what you’re doing here is “bridging” what you got with what streamers want.  What streamers want is viewer attention and new viewers.  So stand out, talk about what most gamers talk about: problems and issues and challenges they have with games and with genres.  This is more attention-grabbing than talking about yourself.

I’ll show you soon how to do this exactly when you get the email script.  But for now, figure out:

What Problem Is Your Game Solving In Your Genre?

Ok, next…

Step 2: Name Me 3 Games That Inspired You To Make Your Game

Ok, this one seems like a weird one, but trust me I’m going somewhere with this one.

So, tell me, what are 3 successful games that got you into game dev? Or what are 3 popular games that are similar to your game?

I’m asking you this because when approaching a streamer, you want some commonality with them… you want to build rapport with them.

Remember, the goal isn’t to blast out 70 emails.  It’s not about numbers.  It’s about relationships.  And the best way to start that relationship is to talk about what you have in common.

And be genuine.  For example, if you don’t like Portal and the streamer loves it, don’t act like you do.  That streamer isn’t a good fit for you then.  And more importantly, their audience isn’t a good fit for you.  Remember, you want to know your target audience and not try to appeal to everybody.  You have better chances if you focus your marketing efforts and find out who your target audience is, and talk to them and only them.  Why? Because people want to feel like, “oh this is exactly made for me”.  But if you try to appeal to everybody, then you’re alienating everybody.  It’s like trying to make a “meat lovers vegan pizza”.  You can’t appeal to everybody.  

So, focus on the quality of the streamer and not the quantity.  And remember, you want to eliminate 80% of most streamers.  I know this is counter-intuitive.  But if you focus on the quality 20%, then you’ll have a higher chance of grabbing their attention.  

Also, you can’t put in all the research and time it takes to grab attention when your goal is to send out 100 emails.  Unless you hire somebody, you just don’t have the time to put in the quality work it takes to grab a streamer’s attention.  

So it’s far better to focus on quality, building relationships, and qualifying the streamer.  And it’s ok to eliminate 80% of the.  Because chances are their audience isn’t your audience.  So it doesn’t make sense to waste time approaching those streamers who are not a good fit.

So come up with three games that inspired you, or 3 popular games that are similar to your game.  

If you’re confused about why you’re doing all this, don’t worry — all of this will come together soon.

Step 3: Find 20 Streamers (YouTube or Twitch) That Love Those 3 Three Games Too

Ok, you know how you came up with 3 games that inspired you or are similar to your games? Well, now what I want you to do is, is to do a keyword search for those three games on YouTube and Twitch.

Find 20 streamers who also love those 3 games you love.

And remember, the goal isn’t quantity.  It’s quality.  You want to find 20 because you can put more time and effort into each streamer before you contact them.

However, if your goal is quantity and you just want to pump out 70 emails, then you’re doing what the majority of what game devs do, and think that by sheer numbers they’ll get better results.  But what happens is, these game devs don’t stand out because most game devs do this.

So it’s more important to focus on the quality of the relationship rather than the quantity.  

Why? Because it means you’ll increase your chances of them playing your game — and playing it soon.

That’s because once you understand what the streamer wants and doesn’t want, you can craft a more compelling message.  If you just aim for quantity and send out 70 emails without understanding what a streamer really wants, then your chances of success will be low because you’re not approaching them with a benefit or advantage.

Ok, to help you with this step, I’ve made a “My Top 20 Streamers List” template in Google Sheets.  Click that link and it’ll open a spreadsheet.  Download it and then open it in your own g-drive so that you can edit it.  

Ok, now let’s go write your compelling message, next…

Your Email Script When Writing To Streamers

So let’s now put everything you learned into a compelling message.  The idea here is to focus on what the streamers want, and less on what you want.  

Ok, here’s the script you can use:

Subject:

Can I get your opinion on a game similar to {their favorite game}?

Message Body:

Hey {their name}, I’ve been watching your youtube videos / twitch streams.  And I noticed that one of your favorite game is {game name}.  And  I’m writing to you because you know how {game name / genre} has this {problem / frustration / challenge here}? Well, I’m making a game similar to {game name}, but I’m trying to fix {problem / frustration / challenge here}.

That’s why I’m approaching you because after watching your videos, I know how much you understand this genre.  And I would love it for you to play the game and tell me your opinions and thoughts.  

And if you find that my approach in fixing {problem / frustration / challenge here} is interesting and unique, then I think your audience would find it interesting too.

So if you want to try out the game and see for yourself how I’m trying to fix {problem / frustration / challenge here} then here’s the game key: {game key}

Or you can download the demo here: {link to download demo}.

Thanks again for your time.

Your Name
Studio Name

How To Get Free Help If You’re Stuck Writing A Compelling Message

By the way, if you’re feeling frustrated trying to figure how to write a compelling message… and whatever you write sounds lame, then here’s how I can help you — no cost, no expectations:

Send me an email to help@howtostartagamecompany.com  or send me a friend request on Discord (my username is: dariuszkonrad).  And tell specifically where you’re having issues writing a compelling message for streamers.

I’ll ask you some questions and try to understand your situation.  And then from there, I’ll give you some techniques and tools to help you with your message to streamers.

Again, there’s no cost, no expectations.  The more I help game devs, the better my own content gets.

Ok, anyway, back to…

Check List: What To Say To A Streamer So They Play Your Game Right Away

Let’s put everything you’ve learned in a neat little checklist you can follow so you make sure that when you approach a streamer you know what to say and get them to play your game — as soon as possible.

Ok, here’s the checklist:

1. Understand that if you want somebody to do  something for you, it’s more about their self-interest and less about yours

2. Majority of game devs fail at getting a streamer to respond because when they approach them they lead with their own self-interest and never think of the interests of the streamer  

3. You have to find an advantage you can “bring to the table”.  To do that you need to understand what a streamer wants and doesn’t want

4. Streamers want three advantages: 1. More views.  And new viewers.  2. Be “first” to talk about what’s going on in the gaming world.  3. Be recognized by an authority so that they become the “go-to” person in their niche and dominate a category in the YouTube / Twitch world

5. You need to “bridge” what you have what what streamers want

6. To “bridge” that gap between what you have and what streamers want, focus on what new ways your game is solving problems in your genre (remember my “tire leak problem”… if you have a problem at the back of our mind that won’t go away, then you’ll perk up and pay attention when somebody talks about it… it’s the same with gamers, they have problems with games and genres that are always nagging them…. use that to grab their attention)

7. Look for streamers looking for you

8. It’s not about the number of emails you send out, it’s the quality of the relationship.  In other words, it’s better to find 20 streamers that align with you and your game than it is to “shotgun” 100 emails to any gaming streamer

9. Use the “My Top 20 Streamers List” spreadsheet to help you find 20 streamers that align with you and your game (link in the description below)

10.  Also, find streamers whose audience will also be your audience.  If you want the streamer’s audience to visit your Steam page and wishlist your game, then you need to narrow your focus and target your main audience.  Focus your marketing. Go where your target audience is hanging out

11.  For each streamer, spend at least one week researching them.  Make a commitment that you’ll watch 25 minutes of their content every day for 5 days.  Also, don’t forget to spend 5 minutes commenting

12.  You’re doing this research because you want to find commonality and build rapport with a streamer before you approach them.  And you want to understand the streamer’s audience too.  You want to make sure that their audience is a good fit for your game  

13. To help you write a compelling message to a streamer so they pay attention to you and play your game, you need to bring to them content that their audience is interested in

14.  What is the audience interested in? New games that are doing new things that gamers haven’t seen before.  So figure out what problem your game is solving in your genre because that’s what players are interested in.  This is how you “bridge” what you have with what streamers want

15. List 3 games that inspired you to make your game.  Or list 3 games that are similar to the game you’re making

16. Now take those three games and find 20 streamers that also love those games. Use the “My Top 20 Streamers List” to help you do this (link in the description below)

17. Now after you’ve done your research, use the script I gave you to email that streamer.  Then next week do the same thing: spend 30 minutes a day researching your next streamer on the list.  Find out what they like and don’t like.  Try to understand why their audience is there. And see if their audience is a good fit for your game

18. Don’t give up if you get no reply.  You might not get a reply at first.  But that’s normal.  But be determined.  You’ve done your research.  And you know that this streamer will love your game and want to talk about it if they only gave you a chance.  So don’t give up, and keep “nudging” them.  Use the “My Top 20 Streamers List” to help you keep track and get ideas on how to do this

19.  If this all feels frustrating and you want me to help you along with the process, then email me at  help@howtostartagamecompany.com  or send me a friend request on Discord, my username is: dariuszkonrad.  There’s no cost, no expectations, no obligations.  I’ll ask you questions to understand your situation better, and then give you tools, templates, and strategies to help you approach streamers and get their attention so they play your game

Your Acton Plan Right Now

My goal in this blog is to help you sell more copies of your indie game.  My goal is to show you business strategies so that your game studio grows.  My goal is to help you market your game so that you make enough profit to support you and your team so you can make your next game.

And I’ve given you my best tools and techniques that have worked for me personally.  From 2000 to 2005 I failed miserably at creating profitable business ideas.  But in 2005 I had my first successful startup (ScanCanada.ca).  And then in 2009, I built another successful startup (HowToScan.ca).  And in 2019, I had my third successful startup (artstation.com/dariuszkonrad).

I’m telling you this because I know what it’s like to fail and not succeed.  I know what it’s like to contact people — people who can help you grow your audience and grow your company… but when you contact them you get very little response or none at all.

But after a lot of trial and error, I eventually learned that to get people to do something for you, it’s less about you and more about them.

My point is, what I’m sharing with you is exactly what I’ve used when trying to grow my companies.  And it’s the same techniques I use when I consult with devs who pay me my fee.  So, I’ve given you my best stuff that has worked for me, and other game devs.  These aren’t just ideas.  These are valuable tools.

So to get the best out of these tools, you gotta put in the effort too.  You can’t just watch YouTube videos and feel like you’re learning.  Too many people just watch tutorials, and fall into a “vortex” of learning and never seeing any actual tangible results.  It’s almost like an addiction: they watch a lot of tutorials, but it doesn’t help their life in any way… it just wastes time. I know because I’ve been there. I don’t know how many C++ tutorials I’ve watched, and yet I still don’t know how to pass a variable through a function.

So it’s important to take action.  And then when you take action, it’s important to see if it is working or not. If it’s not working, iterate and take another action.  You’ll eventually get closer to your goal by taking incremental steps this way.

So do this right now.  And I’m serious.  Go open a Google document. And cut and paste these questions:

What Problem Is Your Game Solving In Your Genre?

What Three Games Inspired Me To Make This Game?

What Three Games Are Similar To My Game?

Take 10 to 15 minutes to answer those questions.  

This is important because if you want streamers to pay attention to you and so they play your game as soon as possible, you need to build a compelling message.  Game devs can no longer just blast out hundreds of emails to streamers and hope to get a few responses.   Your marketing efforts need to be more focused.

So once you answered those questions, open my “My Top 20 Streamers List”.    Use that tool to help you start finding streamers that align with you and your game.  Remember, it’s about quality not quantity. Focus your efforts.  Don’t just throw things up on the wall and hope they stick.  In other words, don’t just blast out 70 emails and hope that a few get a response.  

Find 20 streamers that are like-minded, like the games you like, like the game that inspired your game, and are indie-friendly.  And spend a few hours watching their content. Comment on their stuff. Follow them on twitter. Engage with them and start building that relationship.  They don’t have to reply back or even notice your comments.  But this research and effort will help you write a compelling message that grabs their attention.

Remember it’s not about numbers, but about relationships.

Then when you feel like you understand what what that streamer likes and doesn’t like, you can now send them a compelling message.

And if you need help, use my template:

Subject:

Can I get your opinion on a game similar to {their favorite game}?

Message Body:

Hey {their name}, I’ve been watching your youtube videos {or twitch streams), and I noticed that one of your favorite games is {game name}.  And I’m writing to you because you know how {game name / genre} has this {problem / frustration / challenge here}?  Well, I’m making a game similar to {game name}, but I’m trying to fix {problem / frustration / challenge here}.

That’s why I’m approaching you because after watching your videos, I know how much you understand this genre.  And I would love it for you to play the game and tell me your opinions and thoughts.  

And if you find that my approach in fixing {problem / frustration / challenge here} is interesting and unique, then I think your audience would find it interesting too.

So if you want to try out the game and see for yourself how I’m trying to fix {problem / frustration / challenge here} then here’s the game key: {game key}

Or you can download the demo here: {link to download demo}.

Thanks again for your time.

Your Name
Studio Name

Still stuck? Here’s how to get free help…

if Your Game Launches In A Few Weeks And You Only Have 129 Wishlists, Here’s What To Do To Grow Your Audience and Have A Successful Launch…

In The FREE “Wishlist Workshop” You’ll Learn…

  • Goal is to help you double or triple your game’s wishlists so that your game launch is a success
  • How to differentiate your game in a way so that it “rises to the top” in an overcrowded market place
  • What your player wants so that way you can create content that grab’s their attention
  • Optimize your Steam Store page so that more people wishlist your game
  • How to drive MORE traffic to your Steam page using attention-grabbing content
  • How to develop a relationship with streamers and game journalists even though you’re a small indie dev with no connections
  • How to build “word-of-mouth” for free so that your fans do the marketing for your

This is a FREE 6 week course. Each week you’ll get an insight that is easy to understand. And you’ll get a step-by-step guide showing you how how to execute that insight. And after 6 weeks, the goal is to help you grow your wishlist.

Start NOW. Click the button on the right to download your free copy of the “Wishlist Workshop”, and start growing your audience!

Thanks! And looking forward to helping you find players!

Later,

Dariusz Konrad
Port Stanley, Ontario
Canada